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UH-1 Iroquois
Huey1.jpg
U.S. Army Bell UH-1D Iroquois
Role Utility helicopter
Manufacturer Bell Helicopter
First flight 20 October 1956 (XH-40)
Introduction 1959
Status Production completed, in service
Primary users United States Army
Australian Army
Produced 1956-1986
Number built >16,000
Variants UH-1N Twin Huey
Bell 204/205
Bell 212
Developed into AH-1 Cobra
Bell 214


The Bell UH-1 Iroquois is a military helicopter powered by a single, turboshaft engine, with a two-bladed main rotor and tail rotor.

CharacteristicsEdit

Ordered into production in March 1960, the UH-1 was the first turbine-powered helicopter to enter production for the United States military, and more than 16,000 have been produced worldwide. The first combat operation of the UH-1 was in the service of the U.S. Army during the Vietnam War. The original designation of HU-1 led to the helicopter's nickname of Huey. In September 1962, the designation was changed to UH-1, but Huey remained in common use. Approximately 7,000 UH-1 aircraft saw service in Vietnam.

DevelopmentEdit

The helicopter was developed by Bell Helicopter to meet the United States Army's requirement for a medical evacuation and utility helicopter in 1952, and first flew on 20 October 1956.

UsageEdit

VariantsEdit

Bell UH-1A Iroquois in flight

UH-1A Iroquois in flight.

  • XH-40: The initial Bell 204 prototype. Three prototypes were built, equipped with the Lycoming XT-53-L-1 engine of 700 shp (520 kW)..
  • YH-40: Six aircraft for evaluation, as XH-40 with 12-inch (300 mm) cabin stretch and other modifications.
    • Bell Model 533: One YH-40BF rebuilt as a flight test bed with turbofan engines and wings.
  • HU-1A: Initial Bell 204 production model, redesignated as the UH-1A in 1962. 182 built.[1]
    • TH-1A: UH-1A with dual controls and blind-flying instruments, 14 conversions.[1]
    • XH-1A: A single UH-1A was redesignated for grenade launcher testing in 1960.
  • HU-1B: Upgraded HU-1A, various external and rotor improvements. Redesignated UH-1B in 1962. 1014 built plus four prototypes designated YUH-1B.[1]
    • NUH-1B: a single test aircraft, serial number 64-18261.
  • UH-1C: The UH-1B gunship lacked the power necessary to carry weapons and ammunition and keep up with transport Hueys, and so Bell designed yet another Huey variant, the "UH-1C", intended strictly for the gunship role. It is an UH-1B with improved engine, modified blades and rotor-head for better performance in the gunship role. 767 built.[1]
  • YUH-1D: Seven pre-production prototypes of the UH-1D.
  • UH-1D: Initial Bell 205 production model (long fuselage version of the 204). Designed as a troop carrier to replace the CH-34 then in US Army service. 2008 built many later converted to UH-1H standard.[1]
    • HH-1D: Army crash rescue variant of UH-1D.
  • UH-1E: UH-1B/C for USMC with different avionics and equipment. 192 built.[1]
    • NUH-1E: UH-1E configured for testing.
    • TH-1E: UH-1C configured for Marine Corps training. Twenty were built in 1965.
  • UH-1F: UH-1B/C for USAF with General Electric T58-GE-3 engine of 1,325 shp (988 kW). 120 built.[1] Originally designated H-48.
    • TH-1F: Instrument and Rescue Trainer based on the UH-1F for the USAF. 26 built.[1]
  • UH-1H: Improved UH-1D with a Lycoming T53-L-13 engine of 1,400 shp (1,000 kW). 5435 built.[1]
    • CUH-1H: Canadian Forces designation for the UH-1H utility transport helicopter. Redesignated CH-118.[2] A total of 10 built.[1]
    • EH-1H: Twenty-two aircraft converted by installation of AN/ARQ-33 radio intercept and jamming equipment for Project Quick Fix.
    • HH-1H: SAR variant for the USAF with rescue hoist. A total of 30 built.[1]
    • JUH-1: Five UH-1Hs converted to SOTAS battlefield surveillance configuration with belly-mounted airborne radar.
    • TH-1H: Recently modified UH-1Hs for use as basic helicopter flight trainers by the USAF.
  • UH-1G: Unofficial name applied locally to at least one armed UH-1H by Cambodia.[3]
UH-1J & rapeling infantry

JGSDF UH-1J in Okadama STA, 2007

  • UH-1J: An improved Japanese version of the UH-1H built under license in Japan by Fuji was locally given the designation UH-1J.[4] Among improvements were an Allison T53-L-703 turboshaft engine providing 1,343kW (1,800 shp), a vibration-reduction system, infrared countermeasures, and a night-vision-goggle (NVG) compatible cockpit.[5]
  • HH-1K: Purpose built SAR variant of the Model 204 for the US Navy with USN avionics and equipment. 27 built.[1]
  • TH-1L: Helicopter flight trainer based on the HH-1K for the USN. A total of 45 were built.
    • UH-1L: Utility variant of the TH-1L. Eight were built.
  • UH-1M: Gunship specific UH-1C upgrade with Lycoming T53-L-13 engine of 1,400 shp (1,000 kW).
  • UH-1N: Initial Bell 212 production model, the Bell "Twin Pac" twin-engined Huey.
  • UH-1P: UH-1F variant for USAF for special operations use and attack operations used solely by the USAF 20th Special Operations Squadron, "the Green Hornets".
  • EH-1U: No more than 2 UH-1H aircraft modified for Multiple Target Electronic Warfare System (MULTEWS).[6][7]
  • UH-1V: Aeromedical evacuation, rescue version for the US Army.
  • EH-1X: Ten Electronic warfare UH-1Hs converted under "Quick Fix IIA".
  • UH-1Y: Upgraded variant developed from existing upgraded late model UH-1Ns, with additional emphasis on commonality with the AH-1Z.

Note: In U.S. service the G, J, Q, R, S, T, W and Z model designations are used by the AH-1. The UH-1 and AH-1 are considered members of the same H-1 series. The military does not use I (India) or O (Oscar) for aircraft designations to avoid confusion with "one" and "zero" respectively.


ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.00 1.01 1.02 1.03 1.04 1.05 1.06 1.07 1.08 1.09 1.10 1.11 Andrade 1987, p. 125.
  2. "Bell CH-118 Iroquois." Canadian DND webpage. Retrieved: 30 August 2007.
  3. Forsgren, Jan. "Aviation Royale Khmere/Khmer Air Force Aircraft." Aeroflight, 22 April 2007. Retrieved: 28 October 2008.
  4. UH-1J 多用途ヘリコプター. Retrieved: 11 December 2007.
  5. Goebel, Greg. "[7] Foreign-Build Hueys." The Bell UH-1 Huey. vectorsite.net, 1 December 2007. Retrieved: 16 August 2009.
  6. Buley, Dennis. Aeroflight. 29 December 1999. US Army's Fleet of Special Electronic Mission Aircraft. Retrieved: 28 October 2008
  7. "Special Electronic Mission Aircraft." Globalsecurity.org, 4 April 2005. Retrieved: 28 October 2008

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