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.375 Dakota
Type Rifle
Place of origin USA
Production history
Designer Don Allen
Manufacturer Dakota Arms
Specifications
Parent case .404 Jeffery
Bullet diameter .375 in (Bad rounding hereScript error mm)
Neck diameter .400 in (Bad rounding hereScript error mm)
Shoulder diameter .119 in (Bad rounding hereScript error mm)
Base diameter .545 in (Bad rounding hereScript error mm)
Rim diameter .543 in (Bad rounding hereScript error mm)
Rim thickness .050 in (Bad rounding hereScript error mm)
Case length 2.570 in (Bad rounding hereScript error mm)
Ballistic performance
Bullet weight/type Velocity Energy
227 gr (Bad rounding hereScript error g) Hornady Spire Point Interlock2,700 ft/s (Bad rounding hereScript error m/s)4,370 ft·lbf (Bad rounding hereScript error J)
Test barrel length: 25"
Source(s): http://www.chuckhawks.com/375Dakota.htm, http://stevespages.com/jpg/cd375dakota.jpg

The .375 Dakota is dangerous game cartridge designed by Don Allen, the founder of Dakota Arms of Sturgis, South Dakota.

Like the .375 Ruger and the .376 Steyr, the .375 Dakota was designed to compete with the .375 H&H Magnum, yet have the advantage of having a rimless, beltless case and can function through a standard-length rifle action due to a shorter overall length. Like the .375 Remington Ultra Magnum, this cartridge is based on the Canadian Magnum series of rifle cartridges developed by Aubrey White and Noburo Uno, which were based on the .404 Jeffery cartridge. However, unlike the .375 RUM and the .375 Canadian Magnum cartridges which have rebated rims, the Dakota is of a rimless design. Since the .375 Dakota is a proprietary cartridge neither SAAMI or the CIP have provided guidelines or specifications concerning the cartridge.

The .375 Dakota is available in the Dakota Model 76 and Model 97 bolt-action riles and the Model 10 and Miller single-shot rifles. Both the Model 76 and Model 97 rifles are based on the Winchester pre-'64 Mauser design while the Model 10 and Miller are falling-block rifles.

Performance comparisonEdit

.375 Dakota vs other .375 caliber (9.5 mm) cartridges
Cartridge Bullet weight Muzzle velocity Muzzle energy Source
.375 Dakota 270 gr (Bad rounding hereScript error g) 2,800 ft/s (Bad rounding hereScript error m/s) 4,680 ft·lbf (Bad rounding hereScript error J) Dakota Arms
.375 Dakota 300 gr (Bad rounding hereScript error g) 2,600 ft/s (Bad rounding hereScript error m/s) 4,502 ft·lbf (Bad rounding hereScript error J) Dakota Arms
.375 H&H Magnum 300 gr (Bad rounding hereScript error g) 2,670 ft/s (Bad rounding hereScript error m/s) 4,748 ft·lbf (Bad rounding hereScript error J) Hornady
.375 Remington Ultra Magnum 300 gr (Bad rounding hereScript error g) 2,760 ft/s (Bad rounding hereScript error m/s) 5,073 ft·lbf (Bad rounding hereScript error J) Remington
.375 Ruger 300 gr (Bad rounding hereScript error g) 2,660 ft/s (Bad rounding hereScript error m/s) 4,713 ft·lbf (Bad rounding hereScript error J) Hornady
.375 Winchester 200 gr (Bad rounding hereScript error g) 2,200 ft/s (Bad rounding hereScript error m/s) 2,150 ft·lbf (Bad rounding hereScript error J) Winchester
.375 Weatherby Magnum 300 gr (Bad rounding hereScript error g) 2,800 ft/s (Bad rounding hereScript error m/s) 5,224 ft·lbf (Bad rounding hereScript error J) Weatherby
.376 Steyr 270 gr (Bad rounding hereScript error g) 2,600 ft/s (Bad rounding hereScript error m/s) 4,052 ft·lbf (Bad rounding hereScript error J) Hornady

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit


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