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.30-378 Weatherby Magnum
Type Rifle
Place of origin USA
Production history
Designer Weatherby
Designed 1959 by request of US Army for long range rifle.
Manufacturer Weatherby
Produced 1996 - Current
Variants .30-.378 Magnum, .30/378 Arch, .30/378 Weatherby
Specifications
Parent case .378 Weatherby Magnum
Bullet diameter .308 in (Bad rounding hereScript error mm)
Neck diameter .337 in (Bad rounding hereScript error mm)
Shoulder diameter .561 in (Bad rounding hereScript error mm)
Base diameter .582 in (Bad rounding hereScript error mm)
Rim diameter .579 in (Bad rounding hereScript error mm)
Case length 2.913 in (Bad rounding hereScript error mm)
Overall length 3.690 in (Bad rounding hereScript error mm)
Rifling twist 1-10"
Primer type Large rifle magnum
Maximum pressure 63,817 psi (Bad rounding hereScript error MPa)
Ballistic performance
Bullet weight/type Velocity Energy
165 gr (Bad rounding hereScript error g) BST3,500 ft/s (Bad rounding hereScript error m/s)4,488 ft·lbf (Bad rounding hereScript error J)
180 gr (Bad rounding hereScript error g) BST3,420 ft/s (Bad rounding hereScript error m/s)4,676 ft·lbf (Bad rounding hereScript error J)
200 gr (Bad rounding hereScript error g) Partition3,160 ft/s (Bad rounding hereScript error m/s)4,434 ft·lbf (Bad rounding hereScript error J)
Test barrel length: 26" (660 mm)
Source(s): Weatherby [1]

The .30-378 Weatherby Magnum is a cartridge introduced by Weatherby in 1996 that uses the same case as the previously existing .378 Weatherby Magnum and .460 Weatherby Magnum, necked down to a 30 caliber (7.62 mm) bullet. It is offered with bullets between 165 and 200 grains (10.7 g and 13.0 g) in factory loading, generating velocities able to exceed 3,500 ft/s (Bad rounding hereScript error m/s) and muzzle energies over 4,750 foot-pounds force (Bad rounding hereScript error J).[1] The cartridge was the product of a design/development effort of 1958-1959 between Mr William L. Strickland at the U S Army Ballistics Laboratory of Redstone Arsenal Alabama and Roy Weatherby. The research development contract specified the development/production of a single shot rifle/cartridge combination which could provide a flat nosed and based, 80gr and 100 gr projectile velocity of 6000 ft/s. 35mm high speed motion picture cameras were used to photograph the performance and impact results of various projectile alloys while impacting different types of armor plate. The rifle was removed from the stock and mounted in a machine rest, the armor plate targets were 10' in front of the muzzle. The results of this testing have helped the Army in the development of effective battlefield armor and armor penetrators used on the battlefield today. In later years, projectiles fired in this rifle were studied and designed for hunting game at very long distances, and for marksmanship competition in excess of 1,000 yards (Bad rounding hereScript error m). Script error[citation needed]

PerformanceEdit

The .30-378 case holds as much as 120 grains (Script error g) of powder without requiring a compressed load. This allows the cartridge to develop more energy than the .300 Remington Ultra Magnum and .300 Winchester Magnum, especially when handloads are used.

Muzzle Energy Comparison
Cartridge Bullet Weight Muzzle velocity Muzzle energy Notes
gr g ft/s m/s ft·lbf J
.458 Win Mag 500 Bad rounding hereScript error 2,240 Bad rounding hereScript error 5,570 Bad rounding hereScript error Winchester Safari Supreme loading
.338 Lapua 300 Bad rounding hereScript error 2,800 Bad rounding hereScript error 5,224 Bad rounding hereScript error Black Hills Ammo loading
.375 H&H 300 Bad rounding hereScript error 2,705 Bad rounding hereScript error 4,875 Bad rounding hereScript error Hornady Heavy Magnum loading
.30-378 Wby 200 Bad rounding hereScript error 3,160 Bad rounding hereScript error 4,434 Bad rounding hereScript error Weatherby factory load
.300 RUM 200 Bad rounding hereScript error 3,100 Bad rounding hereScript error 4,269 Bad rounding hereScript error Loading from Nosler custom
.300 Win Mag 180 Bad rounding hereScript error 3,050 Bad rounding hereScript error 3,720 Bad rounding hereScript error Reference load by Doubletapammo

Note: Using the bullet weight and muzzle velocity in each cartridge that provided the maximum muzzle energy. Data for the .30-378 is from.[1] Loading data for all other cartridges can be found at [2]

Performance at ¼ mile (440 yd or 402.3 m)
Cartridge Weight Ballistic
Coefficient
Muzzle Velocity Muzzle Energy Velocity at 440 yd (Bad rounding hereScript error m) Energy at 440 yd (Bad rounding hereScript error m)
gr g ft/s m/s ft·lbf J ft/s m/s ft·lbf J
.30-06 165 Script error 0.475 2,938 Bad rounding hereScript error 3,165 Bad rounding hereScript error 2,110 Bad rounding hereScript error 1,633 Bad rounding hereScript error
.30-378 165 Script error 0.475 3,500 Bad rounding hereScript error 4,448 Bad rounding hereScript error 2,576 Bad rounding hereScript error 2,428 Bad rounding hereScript error
.30-06 180 Script error 0.507 2,798 Bad rounding hereScript error 3,130 Bad rounding hereScript error 2,044 Bad rounding hereScript error 1,668 Bad rounding hereScript error
.30-378 180 Script error 0.507 3,420 Bad rounding hereScript error 4,676 Bad rounding hereScript error 2,559 Bad rounding hereScript error 2,619 Bad rounding hereScript error
.30-06 200 Script error 0.481 2,586 Bad rounding hereScript error 2,972 Bad rounding hereScript error 1,841 Bad rounding hereScript error 1,502 Bad rounding hereScript error
.30-378 200 Script error 0.481 3,160 Bad rounding hereScript error 4,434 Bad rounding hereScript error 2,300 Bad rounding hereScript error 2,351 Bad rounding hereScript error

Note: data for the .30-378 from Weatherby[1] (which tracks closely to what handloaders can achieve based on loading data at.[2] Data from the .30-06 is also from Hodgdon.[2] The initial data used is included here for anyone who cares to run the calculations themselves.

CostsEdit

Rifles built by Weatherby are available in .30-378, and ammunition is significantly more expensive than other cartridges, with ammunition costing upwards of $120 USD for a box of 20 rounds as of 2012.[3] Weatherby offers this caliber in several versions of its Mark V rifle. Due to the strong recoil a round of this energy can create, all Weatherby rifles offered in this caliber include a muzzle-brake. SAKO offered the TRG-S in .30-378 Weatherby at one time but now lists the TRG-S as an "Old Model" and is no longer available.[4]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 Ammo info at Weatherby
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Hodgdon online reloading data
  3. [1] for confirmation of atypical cartridge costs.
  4. Script error

External linksEdit

  • Further reloading data at Hodgdon

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